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in these anecdotal,
sometimes inspiring, sometimes personal meanderings of the Heart's opening in the every-day-ness of Life...

Sunday, April 20, 2014

A Mystical Spirituality...

Being a “mystic”, for me anyway, means experiencing the living Presence of Life that animates all life.  Some call that God, The Divine, Pure Consciousness, Infinite Beingness, Spirit, Brahman, the Tao, etc.  It has many names and forms. It is being able to see the Sacred in the every-day-ness of life – something I admittedly am still “working” on – meaning - I am trying to be more *aware* of the “Sacred” in the mundane affairs of life, in the requirements of daily living; in the must do’s and have-to’s that always find their way to the top of my list, and drive my life...  Learning to actually *see* that it's all “The Mystery” living ItSelf here - as I believe it is; that it is the play of the Infinite Cosmos.

A Mystical Spirituality pertains to direct communion with this Ultimate Reality.  We are always in communion with Ultimate Reality, whether we recognize it or not.  Some may assume this means that a “mystic” doesn’t experience the darker emotions, or frustrations with life.  Some feel that a “mystic” has special insights or powers, or visions, or is only interested in seeking “mystical experiences.”  But for me it is not in *seeking* experiences, but being open to the movement of “the Mystery” and its expressions, *living* in a sense of mystery, and at times experiencing an intimate encounter with what I know to be “The Divine”, like my “Epiphany” back in November, or through “meditative writings” many years ago, and poetry that sometimes just spills out onto the page.  Mystical spirituality acknowledges the Universality of God/Christ Consciousness, or Buddha Nature within, which is not associated with any particular faith, religion, or practice, but is a transcendent spirituality – realizing that humans are both “Divine” and human, both form and formless, spirit and matter.

Wayne Teasdale, a 20th century Christian Mystic, and author of A Mystic Heart, says:
 ‘Mystical spirituality draws us into the depths of our Being, where we come face to face with ourselves, our weakness, AND with the Ultimate Mystery.  Spirituality is not external religiosity, not confined to ritual and liturgy.  It is a way of life that affects and includes every moment of existence…  It is a disposition to a life of depth…  Mystical spirituality is profoundly transformative when it inspires in us the attitude of surrender to “The Mystery,” to the spiritual awakening of mankind…” 
“How we make the journey is what spirituality is really about – finding our own path.  This means finding a way to the vast unlimited consciousness of The Divine, to The Mystery, (or Buddha Nature) within.  We are created for this ‘spiritual journey’ – the direct and immediate experience of Ultimate Reality, which knows everything as ItSelf. Being infinitely aware, it knows in a unitive and universal fashion through awareness of non-duality and non-separation, of no distance between ourselves, the Ultimate Mystery, and all other beings…  The spiritual journey is essentially one of discovering the roots of our true identity.  It is a process of returning to the totality of Consciousness, from which we have arisen.” 
 “Everything is part of an undivided wholeness where each being reflects this totality.  Non-duality means ‘not-two’, and yet, ‘not-one.’  That is, in the relationship between Divine Reality and human being there is a subtle distinction, but not a separation.  And so the relationship is said to be non-dual.  Human beings are *essentially* Divine.” [or Buddha Nature, or Pure Consciousness, etc.].

In a sense then, Easter points us, not to “redemption”, but to the “revelation” of our “Divinity”, or True Identity – discovering again what is already here, that which we were never separated from, but have not always recognized:  the Infinite that continually shines in the depths of our being - as our origin. 
~

“We cannot live in a world that is interpreted for us by others.
[We must] take back our own listening,
use our own voice,
see our own Light.”

Hildegard of Bingen.
12th Century Christian Mystic

~

Photo: a "mistake" :)
Have no clue what this was.
Digitally colored.


8 comments:

  1. Deep but beautiful, as is your image!
    I love happy mistakes these magical images surprise us, all part of the mystery..

    Happy Easter x

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    1. Thank you Sue :) Yes, "happy mistakes" :) Hope your Easter was peaceful....

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  2. "finding our own path. This means finding a way to the vast unlimited consciousness of The Divine within... We are created for this ‘spiritual journey"... YES! I believe we're here as much for spiritual expereiencs as much as personal experience, and really both can be one in the same sometimes. I love what Hildegard says in using our own voice to find our own light. In connecting with the Divine we find out voice to speak with, Divine help makes it all possible. :o) This is beautiful for this spiritual weekend, Christine! And VERY fun you've been having "happy accidents" with photography too! ((HEART-HUGS))

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    1. I like what you say that in "connecting with the Divine we find our voice..." Yes, as we deepen into the awareness of the "Divine" Presence, "our" voice emerges... And "happy accidents" evidently do too! LOL

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  3. What a marvellous collection of inspiring musings on the mysteries of mysticism. Your words offer as clear an account as any I have yet read. I love your blog, and always eagerly anticipate your offerings. Blessings!
    Edith.

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    1. Well, thank you Edith for coming by and leaving your kind words! Coming from a writer such as yourself I am humbled... Am glad that you enjoy the blog :) With gratitude... Christine

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  4. Lovely post Christine. A mystic muses on the mystery. I love your "happy accident"! It is a gift to see the beauty in the accidental. But perhaps it was no accident...

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    1. Thanks Patricia. Good point - "beauty in the accidental. But perhaps it was no accident..." :)

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